IDE Corp
Professional Development for Innovative Schools

#LATICInsights: Teach Consensus-Building!

In the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom, students have many opportunities to make decisions that affect groups, including when to meet, the roles different group members will take, which solution is best for a problem, how to present the solution, and so forth. It’s a perfect opportunity to teach young people how to build consensus rather than relying on the easier, but more dangerous, majority-rule voting.

The problem with majority-rule voting is best summarized in a quote generally attributed to Ben Franklin, “two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch.” In classrooms, and society, the losing side is often angry and subsequently focuses time on how to get others to take sides.

The alternative is to work toward consensus and ensuring that all group members can, in the least, “live with” the decision. The ability to reach consensus will help children during their school years and well beyond throughout their lives. You can use a variety of classroom tools to teach consensus. Here are a few of my favorites:

  • “Love it, hate it, live with it” – As students make group decisions, rather than voting, they state one by one if they love the decision, hate it, or can live with it. If even one person hates it, the discussion continues to find a decision for which everyone can say they love it or can live with it.
  • DeBono’s PMI (Plus, Minus, Interesting ideas or questions) – As students ponder a decision, they stop and take 3-6 minutes to independently jot down two aspects they like about it, two they don’t like about it, and two questions or ideas related to it. They then discuss their entries for each of the three columns. Often, the final decision lies in the third column.

  • Placemat Activity – Students sit around the “placemat” and enter their decision and supporting ideas in an outer area of the paper. They then discuss and, when they arrive at consensus, they put the decision in the middle of the paper. All students then initial it to confirm that they agree with the decision.

  • De Bono’s Six Hats – This is a great tool for looking a decision from a variety of angles. When a group is stuck, they individually jot down ideas for all six hats.

The time spent helping students learn consensus building will pay off through a more productive classroom climate and have lasting effects for society at large. Change the world!

 

IDE Corp. to Present at Future of Education Technology Conference in Orlando, FL

IDE Corp. is pleased to announce that it has been selected for two presentations with Pasco County Schools at the 37th Annual Future of Education Technology Conference. FETC, which is described as “the largest, national, independent education technology conference, annually attracts thousands of education and technology leaders from around the world” will be held at the Orange County Convention Center in Orlando, FL from January 24th to 27th, 2017. Please visit us and send your colleagues to see us in booth 2440!

1) Dr. Nancy Sulla is presenting with Vanessa Hilton, Assistant Superintendent of Student Achievement, Pasco County Schools in session W081: Using Systems Theory to Accelerate Your Technology Initiative on Thursday, January 26, from 2:00 – 4:30 at the Hyatt Regency in Bayhill 29.

2) Tanya Bosco is presenting with Pasco County Schools’ Sanders Memorial STEAM Magnet Elementary School Principal Jason Petry and Assistant Principal Kelly Edwards in session PS155: Designing a Learner-Active STEAM Magnet Elementary School: Stories from the Change Process on Thursday, January 26, from 2:30 – 3:30 in booth #2500 in the Convention Center.

3) And, see Sanders’ Memorial STEAM Magnet Elementary School Third Grade Teachers Tanya Kindberg and Megan Bender present from the teacher perspective of teaching in a STEAM-LATIC school in Session PS032: Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classrooms: Recipe for Success on Thursday, January 26 from 2:30 – 3:30 in booth #965 in the Convention Center.

Founded by Dr. Nancy Sulla, IDE Corp. offers a comprehensive instructional model that is the synthesis of the best research available on student achievement. IDE consultants work with school districts around the country to help them shift paradigms and design new approaches to instruction.  IDE Corp. has been providing instructional and organizational consulting to schools since 1987.

#LATICinsights – Avoiding the No-Man’s Land of Innovation

Innovation requires a shift in mindset and action, sometimes taking you outside of your comfort zone. As you design a Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom, you will no doubt find times that you are outside of your comfort zone. Your tendency might be to drop a structure that doesn’t seem to work for you or your students. Don’t do it!

In the game of tennis, players first played at the baseline. The ball would cross over the net, bounce in the court, and as it approached the back line, the player would hit it back. Over time, the game, and tennis racquet fotolia_tenniscourt_xstechnology, evolved, and the net game was born. The player would run up to the net and hit the ball as it crossed, not waiting for it to bounce first. For some players, this was natural and comfortable. For others, being at the net was stressful, and they would begin to back up, fearing they would miss the ball. The problem is that if they backed up to just the middle of the court, they would find themselves in what tennis folks call “No-Man’s Land” (the center of the court between the net and the baseline.) The balls would bounce at their feet and they could not hit them.

In the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom, if teachers back up and drop a structure here and there, they end up in #LATIC No-Man’s Land. The classroom will not run as smoothly and the students may not achieve to the desired levels. The key is, you can’t drop a structure because each one has an important reason for being there, and the structures support one another. Take a look at the list below. This represents just some of the many structures that make the classroom work.

latic-structures

As you innovate, be sure to lean in, embrace the change, reflect and adjust, but keep moving forward. When something appears to not work, it’s usually because a structure or strategy is missing. Rather than reverting to former methods, find out what’s missing that needs to be added. Avoid No-Man’s Land! Innovate and change the world!

South Orangetown, New York School District Releases Video Highlighting Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom

socsd-lati-videoIn a new video released by the South Orangetown Central School District in New York, Superintendent Dr. Robert Pritchard describes how the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom™ “engages students in real-world, problem-based learning that builds skills and knowledge.” Assistant Superintendent of Curriculum & Instruction, Dr. Brian Culot, describes how the district has been working with IDE Corp. developing their LATI Classsrooms for eight years and continues “making sure that kids have opportunities to work together in groups and partnerships, that they have the opportunity to communicate and collaborate, and to work on critical thinking skills and creativity”.

The video, available on the district website and the district YouTube channel, highlights the experiences of teachers and students in “teacher-guided, but learner-driven” K-12 Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classrooms across the district.

Learn more about the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom.

Founded by Dr. Nancy Sulla, IDE Corp. offers a comprehensive instructional model that is the synthesis of the best research available on student achievement. IDE consultants work with school districts around the country to help them shift paradigms and design new approaches to instruction.  IDE Corp. has been providing instructional and organizational consulting to schools since 1987.

#LATICinsights: Cultivating Rigor

When you first learn to design a Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom, you are faced with the paradigm shift of launching each unit of study with an authentic, open-ended, real-world problem to solve. You start by thinking through the problems students could solve at the end of a five-week unit if they learned everything. Designing the problem-based task statement is just the beginning.

Imagine the task as the gift box that excites students to delve into all of the rich and diverse opportunities to learn. Your next step, therefore, is to fill the unit by building a collection of learning opportunities. My latest video discusses this metaphor in more detail.

Learning opportunities include whole-class lessons, small-group lessons, teacher facilitation, and learning activities. Much of the learning in a Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom takes place through learning activities, rather than teacher dissemination of knowledge through lessons. Unlike activities to practice learning, learning activities should be narrowly focused on a skill or concept, include step-by-step direct instruction, and provide the student with some level of feedback. When designing learning activities, consider the following:

  • What is the grade level standard to be met?
    • All students must meet this standard.
  • What prerequisites would be needed?
    • Some students may need help in mastering prerequisites first, but they cannot stop there; they must achieve the grade level standard.
  • What learning activities can you find or design that provide concept exploration or direct instruction in skills, including a variety of learning modalities, related to the standard?
    • Differentiation should include not only cognitive differences, but learning style differences.
  • What supports/scaffolding could you put in place for students, such as partner work, how-to sheet or video, peer expert board, help board, and teacher facilitation?
    • Once involved in an activity, how can you ensure students will meet with success?

Rigor means ensuring that all students are learning at high levels of understanding and application of at least the grade-level standards. With LATIC students taking greater responsibility for their learning, teachers are freed up to engage more powerfully through facilitation toward greater rigor. Make your gift to your students complete with powerful opportunities to learn. Change the world!

#LATICinsights: Driving Achievement Through a Product or Performance

What would most motivate you to learn how to calculate the perimeter of a space?fence-bubble

  1. Someone tells you to learn it.
  2. You want to fence in an area of your yard and need to know the distance around it.
  3. Someone tells you you’ll need it for your future.

I don’t know about you, but I would pick b! Clearly, I learned a lot in school just because someone told me to learn it; and I also forgot it after the test.

David Sousa’s research on the brain, from his book, How the Brain Learns, points to the need for information to make sense and have meaning in order to be stored in long-term memory. Concepts and skills out of context make no sense and have no meaning to the brain, thus, the reason I promote the use of problem-based learning to drive instruction.

The core of the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom is driving instruction through an authentic, open-ended, problem. Real-world problems are the best! The purpose is to ensure that learning makes sense and has meaning. The keys to designing a powerful, motivating task are to make it:  

  • Standards-aligned (It’s too easy to have a great task that doesn’t get the job done!)
  • Open-ended, meaning there is no one right answer
  • Authentic, meaning the situation occurs in real life
  • Have an audience, that is, someone to whom the student could present the solution
  • Ensure that the task is aligned well with students’ interest so that they are engaged (grappling) rather than compliant

You might have students:

Once you have your problem, and have your students hooked, you must then fill their days with rich and diverse opportunities to learn, so they can, in fact, design the product or performance. Your problem-based task is your strong foundation. Create great problems for your students to solve; change the world!

 

IDE Corp. to Offer Five Sessions at NJSBA Workshop 2016 in Atlantic City, NJ

njsba2016logoIDE Corp. is proud to offer five sessions with our valued clients Tuesday October 25th and Wednesday October 26th at the NJSBA Workshop 2016 conference at the Atlantic City Convention Center.  Come attend our sessions and visit us at booth 719.  Visit the workshop schedule to learn more:

  1. Building Internal Capacity Through Instructional Innovation presented with North Brunswick Township Public Schools
  2. Shifting a School Culture to be Student Driven with Watchung Borough School District
  3. Transformational vs. Transactional Learning: Getting the Job Done with Randolph Public Schools
  4. Community Partnerships Through Problem-Based Learning with Duke Farms
  5. Building on AVID to Design Learner Active, Technology Infused Classrooms with Woodbury City Public Schools

Founded by Dr. Nancy Sulla, IDE Corp. offers a comprehensive instructional model that is the synthesis of the best research available on student achievement. IDE consultants work with school districts around the country to help them shift paradigms and design new approaches to instruction.  IDE Corp. has been providing instructional and organizational consulting to schools since 1987.

Clarkstown, NY Superintendent of Schools Shares His LATI Classroom Workshop Experience

Mr. Martin D. Cox, superintendent of Clarkstown Central School District attended the first day of an IDE Corp. Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom workshop for teachers.  Mr. Cox shared his experience in his blog on the district website.

TR Rathjen, Instructional Strategies Specialist, launched the day in the Felix Festa Middle School library, the first of six sessions, with a quote from Albert Einstein, “I never teach my pupils. I only attempt to provide the conditions in which they can learn.” Mr. Cox described this as “a powerful way to begin a training workshop”.

In his blog post, Mr. Cox also shared a quote from Dr. Michael St. John, Secondary Curriculum Coordinator, who said “at today’s session, TR provided a powerful experience, modeling the LATI Classroom and engaging our teacher participants as if they were students within the model”.  Dr. St. John continued, claiming that “it was an exciting and enriching day for our teachers”.

Learn more about the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom.

Founded by Dr. Nancy Sulla, IDE Corp. offers a comprehensive instructional model that is the synthesis of the best research available on student achievement. IDE consultants work with school districts around the country to help them shift paradigms and design new approaches to instruction.  IDE Corp. has been providing instructional and organizational consulting to schools since 1987.

 

 

Rethinking Success: Engagement, Empowerment, & Efficacy

Like it or not, to most schools, achievement means strong performance on state tests. Some claim to value life preparation and social/emotional growth over test scores, but that never plays well in the annual newspaper articles. What if you could have it all? What if you could rethink success and have happy, healthy, excited students from all walks of life, with strong test scores?

I love to build sand castles, particularly with young children; and I usually start with a large hole in the middle that hits the water (easier to retrieve wet sand.) I begin by sharing a vision and a dream of a sand castle; then I share the news that if we dig dequoteep enough, we will hit water. The dream of hitting water from the sand on the shore is usually all it takes to engage my building partner. As the hole grows, there are skills to retrieving the wet sand and building up the walls. I coach in those skills and share my belief in my building partner’s ability to carry them out (empowerment). Finally, the walls are in place and we begin the work of carving with shells (my dad always told me you carve away everything that doesn’t look like a castle.) Soon, the castle begins to emerge. Now, my building partner spreads wings, creates, and shines with self-belief (efficacy) and the castle grows more and more awesome until there is no more sunlight to guide us.

One of my favorite quotes:

build a shipIf you want an increase in test scores, don’t drum up teachers and coaches to gather up resources and teach to the test. Instead, teach them to long for a day when their students are self-confident, responsible, and excited about learning. Your strong test scores will emerge. Make these your goals:
EEE

Engage students with authentic, open-ended, problems to tackle related to the content to get them in “flow“: get them grappling! Instead of focusing on the skill; focus on where they will use that skill and start there (flip the triangle!)

Empower students by giving them increasing responsibility for their own learning. Let them decide which activities to pursue and when in order to learn the skills they need to accomplish the task that has engaged them.

Build their efficacy through leveling up activities that continue to offer them success, building a belief in their ability to achieve a goal. Let them self-assess, set goals, and accomplish their goals. Essentially, facilitate their learning.

If you aim for engagement, empowerment, and efficacy, your students will be proud, happy, and loving learning; and your test scores will rise! Perhaps success for our students is, in fact, engagement, empowerment, and efficacy.

South Orangetown, NY Students Go Back to School and to the LATI Classroom

SOCSD_RocklandTimesArticle8-18-2016In its August 18th, 2016 edition, the Rockland County Times states that the “South Orangetown School Administration has been working this summer on a valuable series of initiatives to enhance student achievement for the 2016-2017 academic year.” The newspaper quotes Dr. Robert Pritchard, Superintendent of the South Orangetown Central School District as saying, “We want students to exercise the part of their brains that allow them to solve problems that have yet to be solved. Integrating the arts, sciences and humanities fosters creativity and innovation for young learners.”

Dr. Pritchard goes on to describe the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom as a place where “students are ‘empowered’ to take responsibility for setting goals, scheduling time, using resources and making decisions. They are more focused and get involved with problem-solving on open-ended situations by working independently or with their classmates.”

Learn more about the Learner-Active, Technology-Infused Classroom.

Founded by Dr. Nancy Sulla, IDE Corp. offers a comprehensive instructional model that is the synthesis of the best research available on student achievement. IDE consultants work with school districts around the country to help them shift paradigms and design new approaches to instruction.  IDE Corp. has been providing instructional and organizational consulting to schools since 1987.